Manto has liver transplant; brain transplant unlikely

First it was a lung infection.

Then it was pneumonia complicated by pleural effusion.

Then she was having blood transfusions due to a condition “occuring frequently in older women”.

Then she had to be rushed to hospital due to recurring pleural effusion and anaemia.

And then, suddenly, she has a liver transplant. Now they’re saying it’s autoimmune hepatitus. Is it just me, or do these symptoms not really make sense? Is there a doctor in the house?

While we don’t have a waiting list for donor livers in this country (of course not!), it has been confirmed that there are 10 children currently waiting for livers, and that a 66-year-old woman who has suffered a long illness is an ‘unlikely candidate’ for a transplant.

We can only ask ourselves: what strange and mysterious illness will she be diagnosed with next?

9 Responses to “Manto has liver transplant; brain transplant unlikely”

  1. Sounds like liver disease to me. Pleural effusion, while not common, can be seen in patients with cirrhosis resulting from a variety of underlying diseases (such as autoimmune hepatitis, NASH, NAFLD, PSC, etc.) The anemia is very common because the liver helps in making clotting factors and red blood cells. In late stage disease anemia is often a problem and bleeding problems can occur.

    Unfortunately, sometimes getting a correct diagnosis can be a challenge. For 3 years I was diagnosed with everything from Lupus to Contact Dermatitis (allergic rash). When I was finally diagnosed at a different hospital I was about two weeks away from death from complications and infection. Six months later I had a new liver (January 28, 2007) and have been doing wonderfully.

    BTW: I had over 10 blood transfusions BEFORE my transplant because of anemia and clotting problems. I also had thoracenteses every 7 to 14 days for 3 months because of pleural effusion (my right lung stayed collapsed from the fluid.)

  2. Wait, wait, I know! What do you want to bet it’ll be a food allergy to African potatoes? Or beetroot.

  3. It`s never Lupus. Ask House.

  4. Buck: thanks, interesting to hear that these symptoms can be related. I guess it’s unsurprising that in SA, even the highest health authority in the land, who can afford the very best doctors we have, is still subject to misdiagnosis. I’m still a little fuzzy on how she got a new liver so fast. And congrats on your recovery. I hope your good health continues.
    kyknoord: unpossible! Those things are natural, and natural remedies can do your body no harm!
    babyacid: you’re right, it’s not. Pity it wasn’t House, or we’d have had a diagnosis in 42 minutes.

  5. I don’t think autoimmune hepatitis is the right diagnosis, that’s where you body rejects your liver. Now unless Manto’s liver has suddenly become a outspoken advocate for the TAC I don’t think she’d reject it, from what I hear you want to get over the little differences between you and your liver, it’s best to stay friends.

    I think it’s much for likely that her liver has rejected her. Not even it likes her!

    BTW: House is way overrated, so formulaic and crap.

  6. schpat – if it’s a formula that works, let it be! [now to start watching house, i’ve only ever seen one episode]

  7. Insert comment praising House here.

    Insert comments about interesting ethical dilemmas and witty dialog here.

    Insert rectal thermometer into schpat here.

    Insert joke about painkillers here.

  8. residentRsole Says:

    While we don’t have a waiting list for donor livers in this country (of course not!), it has been confirmed that there are 10 children currently waiting for livers, and that a 66-year-old woman who has suffered a long illness is an ‘unlikely candidate’ for a transplant.

    Like third world scum everywhere, our (dis)Honourable Minister of Health has no shame. I believe that first world politicians would not *openly* take a liver that may have saved a child’s life (they would do it very, very quietly).

    I read somewhere that her doctors say that since she is in a private hospital and a private patient, the fact that there are 10 children needing a liver is irrelevant because they are in government hospitals. So, my question is: did the donor’s family sell the organs ? Did they choose who gets to receive the organs of their departed loved one ? Did they choose to give it to Manto instead of one of those long-suffering children ?

  9. Is a sad state of affair when a health minister that is 66 years,had a liver transplant ahead of all the people in the list hoping to get a liver transplant.Is more sad when a person more than 66 years old is given a transplant ahead of younger people in the list,including children.this is more sad as this health minister took so long to give medicines to people with aids and many die,due to that.I wonder what will had happen if the doctors will have put her on the list?Will she had to go to another country as another person was told, so he went to have his transplant in England and i believe had to wait 2-3 years.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: